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Upheavals in the Middle East and North Africa

10 years since the Arab Spring

Prospects for democracy and development in the Middle East and North Africa

Events

Jan

2021

10 Years after the Arab Uprisings: Where does Public Opinion in the Region Stand Today?
KAS PolDiMed Survey Launch

Jan

2021

10 Years after the Arab Uprisings: Where does Public Opinion in the Region Stand Today?
KAS PolDiMed Survey Launch
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Jan

2021

10 Jahre Arabischer Frühling - Tunesien: Rückblick und Ausblick
#KASforDemocracy

Jan

2021

10 Jahre Arabischer Frühling - Tunesien: Rückblick und Ausblick
#KASforDemocracy
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Feb

2021

Zehn Jahre Arabischer Frühling - Rückblick und Ausblick auf den Nahen Osten und Nordafrika
13. #HessenKAS Facebook Live-Gespräch

Feb

2021

Zehn Jahre Arabischer Frühling - Rückblick und Ausblick auf den Nahen Osten und Nordafrika
13. #HessenKAS Facebook Live-Gespräch
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Jan

2021

10 Years after the Arab Spring: Away from Chaos towards Stabilization?
Reflecting the Revolutions in the Middle East and North Africa

Jan

2021

10 Years after the Arab Spring: Away from Chaos towards Stabilization?
Reflecting the Revolutions in the Middle East and North Africa
learn more

In December 2010, demonstrations in the Tunisian hinterland developed into a regional wave of protests that shook the Middle East and North Africa. The demands of the predominantly young demonstrators for "bread, freedom, dignity" on Avenue Bourguiba in Tunis and Tahrir Square in Cairo found an echo in large parts of the Arab world. Within a year, the authoritarian rulers in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Yemen, who had ruled their countries for decades, were overthrown. The term "Arab Spring" was established to describe this historical period, during which many predominantly young people all across the Arab world took to the streets and demanded more socioeconomic participation and political rights.
Yet, rapid democratization and a ‘spring-like’ blossoming of the region did not follow. Instead, geopolitical and identity-based lines of conflict emerged in many contexts, protests were violently suppressed, frustration led to radicalization, and terrorist groups were able to take advantage of the instability in many countries. The past decade has shown that the ‘old order of the Arab world,’ as it had emerged after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and in the course of decolonization, has broken down while no new model of authority, no Herrschaftsmodell, was able to assert itself. The struggle for new structures of order within the societies and between the countries of the region – and the external actors involved in it – continues. Most recently the civil protests of 2019/20 in Iraq, Algeria and Lebanon have once again reminded us that the questions and demands of the "Arab Spring" have still not been answered adequately.

The Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung takes the tenth anniversary of the "Arab Spring" as an opportunity to take stock of the manifold and protracted transformation processes in the Middle East and North Africa. Why has the "Arab Spring" failed in so many countries? Are there nevertheless signs of democratic change? What future do young people in the region want for themselves today? And is there a role for Germany and Europe in this process?

On the theme page you will find a list of events that Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung and its country offices and regional programmes abroad are organizing on the occasion of the "Arab Spring" anniversary as well as references to relevant political reports, studies, surveys, interviews and video statements.

Presseschau und Multimedia

Media library

Podcast, Episode 4
„From Beirut to Baghdad – Konrad’s Journey through the Middle East“ (Episode 4)
Interview with Sam Dagher, journalist and author, on the the Arab Spring in Syria and Iraq and what is left of the demands and hopes of 2011
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REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi
Tunesien und der Arabische Frühling .
Das Land, dem die Demokratie auf den Kopf gefallen ist
Vor zehn Jahren flüchtete Tunesiens Autokrat Ben Ali ins Exil, das Land wurde zur Demokratie. Holger Dix im Gastbeitrag.
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Arabischer Frühling und die Zukunft Tunesiens
Zeitzeuge Sadem Jebali über Revolution und Proteste
Sadem Jebali ist Wissenschaftler und politischer Analyst.
Artem Nezvigin / flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 / creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/
Focus-Online-Gastbeitrag von Dr. Canan Atilgan
10 Jahre Arabischer Frühling: Bilanz ist ernüchternd - Reformen eingefroren
Eine Protestwelle führte dazu, dass in einigen Ländern autokratische Herrscher gestürzt wurden oder Bürgerkriege ausbrachen. Heute sind jegliche Transformationsprozesse eingefroren....
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10 Jahre Arabischer Frühling. Drei Fragen an Michael Bauer
Interview with Jihad Yazigi on the Arab Spring 2011
A decade to the Catastrophe
When Jihad Yazigi, Co-Founder of The Syrian Observer, looks back on the events of the Arab Spring in Syria, only one word comes to his mind: “catastrophe“.
Canan Atilgan auf evangelisch.de
Menschen in der arabischen Welt setzen vermehrt auf Technokraten
Die Agenda habe sich seit den Protesten des "Arabischen Frühlings" vor zehn Jahren verschoben, sagte die Politologin dem Evangelischen Pressedienst (epd).
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"Lebanese Chronicles"
Cooperation with the Zenith magazine
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