Publications

Water Crisis in Cape Town: Lessons to be Learnt (PART 2)

The Responsibilities of the Three Spheres of Government

In the South African Constitution, Bill of Rights, Chapter 2,Paragraph 27 on Health Care, Food, Water and Social Security, it states that "everyone has the right to have access to sufficient food and water". Due to the current water crisis in the Western Cape, this right is threatened. This article seeks to explain the various responsibilities of national, provincial and local government in terms of water supply and water management. It further elaborates on the lessons that the three spheres of government can learn from the crisis. A report by Dorothea Gibson, KAS-Research Assistant

Water Crisis in Cape Town: Lessons to be Learnt (PART 1)

HOW THE CITY’S WATER SUPPLY AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM NEEDS TO CHANGE

After the Western Cape had already declared the drought a provincial disaster, the interministerial task team on drought and water scarcity declared the South African drought a national disaster on the 9th of February 2018 (Business Day, 2018). Is this declaration not long overdue? How does the Water system work in the Western Cape and how can ‘Day Zero’ be avoided in future? This article series aims at giving answers to these questions. Part 1 will deal with the Western Cape Water Supply System and possible alternatives of water supply to prevent ‘Day Zero’ in future.

Multilingualism Conference

The Importance of Multilingualism in promoting and deepening social cohesion and nation building in South Africa

South Africa has eleven official languages namely English, Afrikaans, Zulu, Xhosa, South Sotho, Tswana, North Sotho, Venda, Tsonga, Swati and Ndebele. However, English is dominant in society but especially in workplaces and schools. Afrikaans used to have prominence however, its importance is slowly diminishing but the rest of the African Languages are still lagging behind. In recent times, there have been students’ protests especially at institutions of Higher Learning, the students’ main concern is that they do not want to learn in Afrikaans mostly preferring to be taught in English.

Anti-Xenophobia Dialogue

The Anti-Xenophobia Dialogue is done in cooperation with the South African Council of Churches in Gauteng. It forms part of a series of events which aims at the eradication of xenophobia and promotion of social cohesion by strengthening conflict resolution skills of community leaders, improving liaison with Government and other agencies on the provision of relief during attacks.The first Dialogue took place on the 14th of February 2018 at Khotso House in Johannesburg.

KwaZulu-Natal Democracy and Election Forum

KZNCC and DDP collaborate to reignite the KZN Democracy Forum

Democracy Development Program in partnership with the KZN Christian Council convened a meeting with civil society and religious leaders who have an interest in participating in a civil society entitative with regards to the upcoming national elections in South Africa. This was to provide among others, an understanding of the changing political context in KwaZul- Natal.

Looking Ahead for 2018

Local and International Change Scenarios

“The future of South Africa depends on how much emphasis will be set on prioritizing economic growth and building a unified political and civil society” was the leading argument by Dr. Jakkie Cilliers from the Institute of Security Studies (ISS) at the first breakfast briefing, jointly hosted by the School for Public Leadership (SPL) at Stellenbosch University, the Centre for Constitutional Rights (CFCR) and the Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung (KAS) on 15th February 2018 at the Sun Square Hotel in Cape Town.

FW de Klerk Annual Conference 2018: South Africa Beyond State Capture and Corruption

Defending and strengthening the valuable South African Constitution

“South Africa beyond State Capture and Corruption” was the title of this year’s annual FW de Klerk Conference held on the 2nd of February 2018 in cooperation with the Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung (KAS). The leading question addressed by former South African president F.W. de Klerk was how South Africans “as a country are going to re-establish a system of governance that is characterised by integrity – with key institutions that operate in the public interest effectively, professionally, efficiently and without fear, favour or prejudice”.

Is Zimbabwe Really in a Post-Mugabe Era?

On Wednesday, the 17th of January 2018, Prof. Brian Raftopoulos, formally Professor for Development Studies at the University of Zimbabwe and Director of Research and Advocacy in the Solidarity Peace Trust, gave a presentation on the events leading to the resignation of Zimbabwe´s former president Robert Mugabe and the country’s future political and economic outlook. The South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA), a highly rated think tank specializing in International Relations issues and long-term partner of the Konrad Adenauer Foundation, hosted the event in Cape Town.

The Vth AU-EU summit: a turning point for relations between Africa and Europe?

On 29th and 30th of November 2017 the 5th AU-EU Summit took place in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. 16 of the 28 EU Member States attended the summit, amongst them the German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron. For both countries Africa stands high on the political agenda, and the ad hoc initiative undertaken at the summit to address the modern slave trade in Libya highlights the joint concern but also the renewed Franco-German partner- and leadership.

The UN Global Compacts on Migration and Refugees: A New Solution to Migration Management, or more of the same?

SAIIA Occasional Paper No 273, November 2017

This paper by Asmita Parshotam examines the Migration Compact in light of existing tensions among UN member states, what it hopes to achieve, and how it differs from the Global Compact on Refugees.