Articles

Image fragment Solon: Sailko via Wikimedia.

2020

Editorial

by Gerhard Wahlers

Rapid technological developments witnessed over recent decades offer many opportunities, but also present us with new challenges – political, social, and sometimes private. Strategic questions regarding the political design of our digital future need to be considered at the international level in particular. This is because strict technological separation of a wide variety of state and non-state actors is now virtually impossible. Globalised goods, services, communications, and data streams are shaping the world.
Carlos Barria, Reuters

2020

Between Yurts and Skyscrapers

by Johann C. Fuhrmann

Mongolia’s Youth are Grappling with a Corrupt Elite
Young people in Mongolia are fighting for a say in politics. Internet activists are protesting against corruption in politics and business. In Ulaanbaatar, young women are fighting against sexual violence, and for more political participation. Meanwhile, traditional ways of life are in retreat. Are profound social changes, coupled with an ossified political elite, splitting Mongolian society?

2020

Democratising Deepfakes

by Nauel Semaan

How Technological Development Can Influence Our Social Consensus
The dissemination of fake news as a political instrument has long been an issue in contemporary political discourse. It is important to react to technological innovations that continue to expand the potential for disinformation campaigns, threatening our domestic security. Nauel Semaan talked to Dr. Hans-Jakob Schindler, Senior Director of the Counter Extremism Project, about the “new superweapon of fake news” – so-called deepfakes.
Kai Pfaffenbach, Reuters

2020

Digital Cooperation – An Opportunity to Advance Sustainable Development

by Fabrizio Hochschild

In today’s complex digital world, we see enormous advantages of digital technologies, which will play an increasingly important role in sustainable development in the coming years. Of course, we are also experiencing risks and challenges in the rapid development of these technologies. These challenges can no longer be met by individual organisations or countries. Instead, the answer to these challenges depends on cooperation between different groups, sectors, stakeholders, and countries.
Yannis Behrakis, Reuters

2020

Digital Democracy in Action

by Henri Bohnet, Martha Kontodaimon

How Greece Wants to Catch Up with Europe
The new government in Greece is not wasting time and has a clear plan to make up for the lost years of financial and economic turmoil. There is still a lot to do: in 2019, Greece ranked only 26th among the 28 EU member states on the European Commission Digital Economy and Society Index (DESI). Without digitalising, and slashing its bloated and overstaffed bureaucracy, the country will not achieve its aim of becoming an attractive destination for investment. The current efforts offer the chance to change the perception of Greece as the sick man of Europe.
Dado Ruvić, Reuters

2020

E-Currency

by Jason Chumtong

Digital Money for the Digital State
Facebook wants to enter the financial sector in 2020 with Libra, its cryptocurrency. With its two billion users worldwide, the social media company could become a serious actor overnight, developing clout that is comparable to that of traditional central banks. Several concerns have recently been expressed around the world, although even governments are developing e-currencies of their own.
Thomas Peter, Reuters

2020

Invented in China

by Sebastian Weise

High Technology in the Service of Illiberalism
30 years following the collapse of the Soviet Union, international politics is facing some fundamental questions once again. Whereas during the Cold War it was the socialist doctrine of the USSR, now it is China’s digitally empowered authoritarianism that poses a challenge to the West. In this conflict between two different systems, the focus is no longer solely on military capabilities, but also on key digital technologies and emerging industries. If the West is to prevail, it has to make an objective assessment of China’s capacity to innovate and find answers that take the factuality of globalisation in research, innovation and business into account.
Gleb Garanich, Reuters

2020

The Second Generation of Climate Minilateralism

by Louis Mourier

Building a New Mitigation Alliance
With multilateral progress on climate change lagging behind, a range of “minilateral” climate alliances have emerged over the past years. However, most of these climate clubs only had a limited impact in practice. In order to accelerate global climate action, there is a need for a second generation of climate minilateralism – a new Mitigation Alliance that provides exclusive benefits, comprises enthusiastic actors, and is closely aligned with the Paris Agreement.
Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah, Reuters

2020

Who Holds Sovereignty Over the Internet?

by Mathias Kamp

Social Media and Democracy in Africa
In Africa, the continent with the greatest democratic deficits, the internet, and above all social media, offers new opportunities for civic participation, transparency and public access to information. Yet the initial euphoria about the emancipatory potential of social media is increasingly being tempered by scepticism. It is hard to ignore the internet’s dark side, such as the spread of hate speech and fake news. Meanwhile, Africa’s autocratic regimes are becoming more adept at instrumentalising social media to serve their own ends.
Vincent Kessler, Reuters

2020

A Judgement Is Important – Enforcement Even More So!

by Franziska Rinke, Pierre Szczepanik

A Comparison of Regional Human Rights Courts
International human rights protection has gained in importance over the last sixty years. The primary indicator of this development is the submission of states to the judgements of international human rights courts. However, the mere existence of these courts does not guarantee success. People can assert their rights only when judgements are properly and completely carried out. The following article illuminates the various mechanisms for implementing and enforcing judgements of the three existing international human rights courts.

About this series

This periodical responds to questions concerning international issues, foreign policy and development cooperation. It is aimed at access of information about the international work for public and experts.

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Editor

Dr. Gerhard Wahlers

ISBN

0177-7521

Benjamin Gaul

Benjamin Gaul bild

Head of International Reports and Communication

benjamin.gaul@kas.de +49 30 26996 3584

Samuel Krug

Samuel Krug 2020

Editor in chief International reports

samuel.krug@kas.de +49 30 26996 3818

Louisa Heuss

Louisa Heuss (2020)

Referentin Kommunikation und Vermarktung

louisa.heuss@kas.de +49 30 26996 3916 +49 30 26996 53916

Dr. Anja Schnabel

Dr

Managing Editor International Reports

anja.schnabel@kas.de +49 (0)30-26996-3740