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International Reports 5/2011


Tunisia – A Revolution and its Consequences | The Arab Youth and the Dawn of Democracy | Between Paradise and Prison – Senegalese Migrants and the Response of the European Union | Museveni’s Uganda: Eternal Subscription for Power? | Brazil’s Place in the Post-Crisis New Global Economic Order | The Internet Policy in France and the Role of the Independent Administrative Authority CNIL

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Content

  • Editorial

    The pictures from Tahrir Square in Cairo and Avenue Bourguiba in Tunis which heralded the start of a new political and social era may have been stirring and euphoric, but it is clear that there is now a long journey ahead. Hopefully it will be a successful one. For sure it will be a hard journey and there are could be setbacks along the way. Germany and Europe as a whole have every reason and also a duty to accompany and support both countries along this path.

    by Gerhard Wahlers

  • Tunisia – A Revolution and its Consequences

    On January 14, 2011 the Tunisians won a great victory. Within just four weeks the desire for freedom, democracy and dignity succeeded in toppling a dictator from his pedestal. Many people in other countries have followed the events in Tunisia with interest, sympathy and even excitement. Tunisia’s revolution has started a wave of change across the whole Arab world. Furthermore, the changes in Tunisia have opened the door to new opportunities to strengthen Euro-Mediterranean relations.

    by Thomas Schiller

  • The Arab Youth and the Dawn of Democracy

    The political upheavals which have been experienced by so many Arab nations over the past few months are due to the political mobilisation of large sections of the countries’ youth. In political terms this is hugely significant, as Egypt and Tunisia are not the only countries where over half the population is under 30 years of age. Most of the youthful demonstrators clearly came from the ranks of the middle classes, who had been suffering from the effects of the financial crisis.

    by Michael A. Lange

  • Between Paradise and Prison – Senegalese Migrants and the Response of the European Union

    It has become an everyday occurrence to see boats full of African migrants being met by coast guards. The two affected countries, Italy and Spain, are asking other EU states to show their support by taking in some of these African refugees. In order to avoid uncontrolled and unsustainable migration to Europe and to promote the development of human resources in Africa, it is crucial to strengthen the European-African partnership. Senegal is playing a key role in this process.

    by Stefan Gehrold, Matthias Bunk

  • Museveni’s Uganda: Eternal Subscription for Power?

    Parliamentary and presidential elections took place in Uganda in February – the second elections under the relatively new democratic system. Yoweri Museveni, who has been in power since 1986, was re-elected president with a two-thirds majority, so his term of office can now extend to 30 years. By and large the elections went off in a peaceful fashion. The initial reaction of the opposition parties was to blame the ruling party’s manipulation of the voting for their poor showing.

    by Peter Girke, Mathias Kamp

  • Brazil’s Place in the Post-Crisis New Global Economic Order

    The global economic crisis which came to a head in September 2008 has left the global economy in an unprecedented situation. The leading industrial nations which caused the crisis and which are at its heart have felt its effects much more strongly than many emerging nations. Brazil is taking an increasingly important role in the discussions about a new global financial and monetary system. Its influence among developing countries is also likely to keep growing.

    by Maria Antonieta Del Tedesco Lins

  • The Internet Policy in France and the Role of the Independent Administrative Authority CNIL

    The Internet is playing an increasingly important role in Western societies and it raises many questions for governments and businesses. The specific action of the State for the establishment of more or less developed mechanisms for monitoring the internet must be conducted with respect for the privacy of individuals. On all these issues, the CNIL-Commission is leading the effort for the development of the Internet with respect for the rights and freedoms of individuals.

    by Alex Türk

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About this series

International Reports (IR) is the Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung's periodical on international politics. It offers political analyses by our experts in Berlin and from more than 100 offices across all regions of the world. Contributions by named authors do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the editorial team.

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Editor

Dr. Gerhard Wahlers

ISBN

0177-7521

Benjamin Gaul

Benjamin Gaul

Head of the Department International Reports and Communication

benjamin.gaul@kas.de +49 30 26996 3584

Dr. Sören Soika

Dr

Editor-in-Chief International Reports (Ai)

soeren.soika@kas.de +49 30 26996 3388