Water. Power. Conflict.


Some 30 years ago, Boutros Boutros-Ghali – who went on to become UN Secretary General – predicted that the wars of the future would be fought over water. His prediction has not yet come true, but when we look at the various regions of the world, it is clear water is becoming an increasingly scarce resource that is indeed at the centre of many conflicts – or is at least exacerbating them significantly.

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Content

Water. Power. Conflict.

  • Editorial

    Some 30 years ago, Boutros Boutros-Ghali – who went on to become UN Secretary General – predicted that the wars of the future would be fought over water. His prediction has not yet come true, but when we look at the various regions of the world, it is clear water is becoming an increasingly scarce resource that is indeed at the centre of many conflicts – or is at least exacerbating them significantly.

    by Gerhard Wahlers

  • A Breakthrough at Long Last?

    On the Revival of the Israeli–Palestinian Joint Water Committee

    The crisis-ridden Middle East is among the world’s water scarcest regions. The issue of the equitable distribution ofthe cross-border resource water regularly fuels conflicts. Unresolved water issues are proving to be an obstacle to peace between Israelis and Palestinians. The decision to revive the Israeli–Palestinian Joint Water Committee has led to a rapprochement in the water sector after years of inactivity. Will the breakthrough now succeed?

    by Marc Frings, Johannes Lutz

  • Big Lake, Big Problems

    Is There Still Time to Secure the Water Resources Lake Victoria Provides?

    Lake Victoria is essential to the lives of over 30 million people. Water pollution, resource exploitation and a lack of regional cooperation are threatening its ecological balance. The situation is exacerbated by the high population growth rate. There are justifiable doubts as to whether the future of the essential water resource provided by Africa’s largest lake is secure.

    by Daniel El-Noshokaty

  • Private vs. Public

    Thoughts on Regulatory Matters Relating to Water Supply in Latin America

    While the wave of public service privatisation in Latin America is waning, the underlying issue of regulation remains unresolved. The failure of many projects in the water sector after some initial successes shows that huge challenges remain, whether the water supply is in public or private hands. This is in part due to a failure to engage in a debate about a stable governance model for the region.

    by Gunter Rieck Moncayo, Maximilian Wichert

  • Coercive Water-Diplomacy

    Playing Politics with the Mekong

    In Asia, water has become a critical non-traditional security issue. Reduced water flow, resulting from Chinese hydropower dam construction, threatens food and socio-economic security. Simultaneously, China gains a potent political instrument with the ability to “turn off the tap”. The Mekong demonstrates the region’s need for rules-based institutionalised water cooperation.

    by Rabea Brauer, Frederick Kliem

Other Topics

  • Rwanda as a Model?

    On the State of Development in Rwanda and the Country’s Significance as a Role Model for Africa

    Stemming the flow of migrants from Africa requires new initiatives to promote economic development in Sub-Saharan Africa. The challenge is to fight the causes of flight and open up prospects for the African youth in their own countries. Rwanda is seen as a prime example of successful development, in part due to large-scale international support. Is its development concept truly pioneering and transferable to other countries?

    by Peter Molt

  • A Shadow of the Past?

    Latin America’s Fight against Corruption

    News stories about corruption cases in Latin America are ubiquitous. Most recently, the bribery scandal relating to the Brazilian construction company Odebrecht made headlines worldwide. Despite or maybe because of these frequent bad news stories there has been a significant increase in anti-corruption measures in Latin America since the beginning of this year. The continent still has a long way to go in its efforts to fight corruption effectively. But there are signs that a turnaround may for the first time finally be possible.

    by Marie-Christine Fuchs

About this series

This periodical responds to questions concerning international issues, foreign policy and development cooperation. It is aimed at access of information about the international work for public and experts.

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Editor

Dr. Gerhard Wahlers

ISBN

0177-7521

Benjamin Gaul

Benjamin Gaul

Head of the Department International Reports and Communication

benjamin.gaul@kas.de +49 30 26996 3584

Dr. Sören Soika

Dr

Editor-in-Chief International Reports (Ai)

soeren.soika@kas.de +49 30 26996 3388

Louisa Heuss

Louisa Heuss (2020)

Desk Officer for Communication and Marketing

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Fabian Wagener

Fabian Wagener

Desk Officer for Multimedia

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