Events

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Event

Konrad-Adenauer-Foundation Open Day 2021

„Politics and trust“

The work of the Konrad-Adenauer-Foundation: focusing on participation, representation, security, and innovation.

Online-Seminar

"Adenauer-Conference" with Armin Laschet

Germany’s Role in International Security Affairs

With a keynote speech on foreign and security policy by Minister-President Armin Laschet, this year's Adenauer Conference opens the discussion on key security issues and international challenges. Besides the priorities for German foreign and security policy, the focus of the debate this year is also on Afghanistan and transatlantic relations.

Discussion

SA's Corona Parliament: Virtually working?

Join Rebecca Sibanda as she launches and discusses the findings of her new paper.

At this event Rebecca Sibanda of the Parliamentary Monitoring Group will launch and discuss the findings of her new paper Implications of a Virtual Parliament on its Constitutional Mandate. In the paper, she reviews the performance of South Africa's Parliament during the Covid-19 epidemic. Enriching and challenging her conclusions will be Marianne Merten of the Daily Maverick. The Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung thanks the Parliamentary Monitoring Group for its collaboration in this research.

Online-Seminar

Book Launch-The Global South and Comparative Constitutional Law

Philipp Dann, Michael Riegner and Maxim Bönnemann (Editors)

This volume makes a timely intervention into a field marked by a shift from unipolar to multipolar order and a pluralization of constitutional law. It addresses the theoretical and epistemic foundations of Southern constitutionalism and discusses its distinctive themes, such as transformative constitutionalism, inequality, access to justice, and authoritarian legality.

Online-Seminar

Wrecking Ball

Why Permanent Technological Unemployment, a Predictable Pandemic and Other Wicked Problems Will End South Africa’s Experiment in Inclusive Democracy

Wrecking Ball explores, in novel theoretical manner, a decalogue of wicked problems that could easily end contemporary civilization. Written in the vernacular of political economy, it demonstrates that without an inclusive centralized system of global political and economic institutions, the collective action required to solve these wicked problems falls beyond the remit of the world’s 200 still predominantly extractive and elitist polities. To prove its manifold theses, Wrecking Ball grounds its analysis in an extended study of contemporary South Africa and shows that this country’s elitist and extractive political and economic institutions not only make resolution of ongoing domestic crises unattainable, but make meaningful responses to wicked problems impossible.

Online-Seminar

‘What are the obligations of states and corporations to ensure access to a COVID-19 vaccine?

Vaccine access is a matter of life and death for many. For others it is a matter of their livelihoods.

A number of vaccines for COVID-19 have been developed in record time and the hope is that this will bring an end to the death, suffering, and disruption to ordinary life caused by the pandemic. Yet, currently, only a small number of countries from the Global North are being able to vaccinate at a rapid rate with access to COVID-19 vaccines having been conditioned by the ability to make large investments in the developments of the vaccine. The vaccines are being manufactured by large private companies, based almost exclusively in the Global North, who have become household names. Yet, their development involved not only private funding but also large amounts of public money and research. Moreover, some of the vaccines were tested on people living in countries in the Global South, including in South Africa. The patenting of the vaccines not only has allowed for the ability of companies to charge high prices but also restrictions on who may supply the vaccines which is partly responsible for current shortages.

Online-Seminar

Human Rights Law and Children's Right to Education

Can Human Rights Law Provide Guidance on Realising a Child's Right to Education in the Face of a Pandemic?

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, children’s access to education in the African context was already unequal. COVID-19 has exacerbated the situation with lockdowns, widespread school closures, the use of online learning in resource-poor contexts and limited tuition at schools when, and if, they resumed in-person teaching. Apart from these educational impacts, COVID-19 has also affected other rights of children: for instance, there have been increases in domestic violence, as well as an inability to access school meals that provided much-needed nutrition.

Online-Seminar

CANRAD/KAS-Youth and Democracy Series

Impact of Covid-19 on youth: Opportunities and Challenges

COVID-19 has a detrimental effect on the youths and this may prove to be one of its damaging legacies. In fact, the coronavirus crisis risks turning back the clock on years of progress made on young people’s well-being and has put their rights under serious pressure across the globe. Issues of access to education, domestic abuse, child labour and lack of decent work are some of the many challenges that many institutions are grappling with. While the universities, NGOs, as well as governments are turning their attention to these problems, young people also have a key role to play in finding solutions.

Online-Seminar

Poor Education, Poor Economy and Planning the Escape

The South African education system is in crisis. According to Statistics SA, half of all learners drop out of school before reaching matric.

The government fails learners in poor communities by failing to provide schools with adequate infrastructure and qualified teachers. Inequality in South Africa is further exacerbated by an education system that does not adequately prepare learners for the world of work. Learners from disadvantaged communities cannot compete with their peers from affluent communities.

Online-Seminar

The Midpoint Debate: Book Launch Brittle Democracies?

Comparing Politics in Anglophone Africa

Brittle Democracies? Comparing Politics in Anglophone Africa compares the democratic principles, presence and performance of ten former British Colonies across Sub-Saharan Africa. It aims to see what trends are present and what challenges this subset of African democracies face

Community Awareness Outreach at Sani II Village in Zomba-Malawi

The objective for the community awareness outreach was to contribute towards ensuring that women are informed of their rights and the traditional and codified legal context as well as possible legal recourse and show first steps of demanding these rights.

Managing Migration from Sub-Saharan Africa: The Developmental Approach

The event held at the Mountain Club of South Africa in Cape Town on the 22nd of March 2018, jointly hosted by the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) Western Cape Branch and the Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung (KAS), provided a platform for a lively debate on the question of how to manage migration from Sub-Saharan Africa in a developmental approach.

Orientation Workshop for Traditional Leaders in Zomba

Sensitization training workshop for traditional leaders on the new land law in Malawi.

The orientation workshop for traditional leaders was held at Nsondole Teachers Development Centre in Zomba-Malawi. It aimed at ensuring that in settling land disputes, traditional authorities increasingly consider codified law and strengthen the position of women in issues of land use and land ownership. The workshop focused on how the past and present legal framework of land laws have undermined women’s land rights in Malawi. It was an introductory training workshop for two lower tiers in the traditional leadership in Malawi namely Group Village Headmen/women and Village Headmen/women.

Together for Justice

Exploring contemporary challenges for churches and civil society

“Together for Justice – Exploring contemporary challenges for churches and civil society in the context of post-colonial Southern African and German Partnerships” was the title of the conference jointly organized by the South African Council of Churches (SACC), the Evangelische Kirche Deutschland (EKD), the Desmond Tutu Centre, the Ecumenical Foundation of Southern Africa Institute, the Centre for Christian Spirituality and Kairos Southern Africa with financial support of the KAS. The conference took place from the 14th to the 17th of March 2018 at the University of the Western Cape (UWC).

Event Report: Human Rights Report Card Launch 2018

On Monday, 23rd of March 2018 the Centre for Constitutional Rights (CFCR) in co-operation with the Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung (KAS) welcomed the audience to the launch of the Human Rights Report Card 2018 at the Townhouse Hotel in Cape Town. The Human Rights Report Card assesses and monitors the implementation of human rights in South Africa on an annual basis. The report was launched for the ninth time.

Human Rights and Governance Implications of the Water Crisis in the City of Cape Town

Roundtable Discussion

On Tuesday, the 6th of March 2018, the Dullah Omar Institute (DOI) in cooperation with the Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung (KAS) hosted a roundtable discussion on the topic “Human Rights and Governance Implications of the Water Crisis in the City of Cape Town” at the Pepper Club Hotel in Cape Town. The roundtable discussion with distinguished panelists from academia, civil society and the City of Cape Town provided the audience with a platform for a fruitful exchange about the impacts of the water crisis and the challenges it poses in terms of cooperative governance.

Dialogue in Contemporary South Africa: Opportunities and Risks

CUD Roundtable Series 2018: Nr. 1

“Dialogue in Contemporary South Africa: Opportunities and Risks” was the title of the first roundtable discussion on 1st March 2018, organized by the Centre for Unity in Diversity (CUD) in collaboration with the Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung (KAS) at the Sun Square Hotel in Cape Town. The well attended event with renowned academic and author Prof. Jonathan Jansen as guest speaker provided the audience with a platform for a fruitful exchange about the shift in campus culture.

Multilingualism Conference

The Importance of Multilingualism in promoting and deepening social cohesion and nation building in South Africa

South Africa has eleven official languages namely English, Afrikaans, Zulu, Xhosa, South Sotho, Tswana, North Sotho, Venda, Tsonga, Swati and Ndebele. However, English is dominant in society but especially in workplaces and schools. Afrikaans used to have prominence however, its importance is slowly diminishing but the rest of the African Languages are still lagging behind. In recent times, there have been students’ protests especially at institutions of Higher Learning, the students’ main concern is that they do not want to learn in Afrikaans mostly preferring to be taught in English.

Anti-Xenophobia Dialogue

The Anti-Xenophobia Dialogue is done in cooperation with the South African Council of Churches in Gauteng. It forms part of a series of events which aims at the eradication of xenophobia and promotion of social cohesion by strengthening conflict resolution skills of community leaders, improving liaison with Government and other agencies on the provision of relief during attacks.The first Dialogue took place on the 14th of February 2018 at Khotso House in Johannesburg.

KwaZulu-Natal Democracy and Election Forum

KZNCC and DDP collaborate to reignite the KZN Democracy Forum

Democracy Development Program in partnership with the KZN Christian Council convened a meeting with civil society and religious leaders who have an interest in participating in a civil society entitative with regards to the upcoming national elections in South Africa. This was to provide among others, an understanding of the changing political context in KwaZul- Natal.